Politics

Woman Who Allegedly Tried To Assassinate Trump By Sending Him Poison Is Identified

Over the weekend, we reported that there was an alleged assassination attempt on President Donald Trump when someone sent a package containing the poison ricin to the White House, addressing it to the president. Now, the person who was allegedly behind this has been identified.

Pascale Ferrier of Quebec, Canada was taken into custody on Sunday for allegedly sending ricin to Trump, according to The New York Post. She was apprehended by US Customs and Border Protection agents at the Peace Bridge border crossing near Buffalo, New York.

Ferrier was scheduled to appear in court on Monday, but her appearance was delayed until Tuesday. She had been living in the United States since last year, and court documents show that she was arrested in May of 2019 in Mission for using a fake driver’s license. Ferrier pleaded not guilty to this charge and spent twenty days behind bars before the charge was dropped because it was her first offense.

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Royal Canadian Mounted Police spokesman Cpl. Charles said that on Monday, officers carried out a search of a condo in Saint-Hubert on Montreal’s South Shore in connection with the ricin-laced envelopes. While he said that there is a link between Ferrier and the condo, he would not confirm that she lived there.

“The RCMP is assisting the FBI in this investigation,” Poirier told reporters. “We believe a total of six letters were sent — one to the White House and five to Texas.”

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Though Poirier would not elaborate on where in Texas the envelopes were sent, Sheriff Eddie Guerra of the Hidalgo County Sheriff’s Office in Edinburg, Texas has since confirmed that ricin was mailed to him as well as to three members of his detention staff. Thankfully, Guerra added that nobody in his department was injured by the letters.

Ricin is a poison that is extracted from the seed of the castor plant, often called a “castor bean,” despite not actually being a bean. ”

“An average adult needs only 1.78 mg of ricin injected or inhaled to die; that’s about the size of a few grains of table salt—which ricin resembles visually,” according to Popular Science.

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