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MomZette

Nine-Year-Old Kid in Colorado Helps Overturn Ban on Snowball Fights

What's winter if you can't have a little outdoor fun?

During a class trip to his local town hall in October, Colorado third grader Dane Best and his classmates learned of an existing law, which, among other things, prohibited the throwing of snowballs.

“The mayor told us about crazy laws,” exclaimed the young student.

This was no time to sit around and let the man impede any upcoming fun winter activities.

So the fight was on to repeal the approximately century-old ban.

Best recruited his fellow Range View Elementary School students in Severance, Colorado, to write letters to the board while he and his family researched the town and its laws.

“Today’s kids need reasons to play outside,” said Best, according to Colorado Public Radio.

He even cited studies in his explanation: “Research suggests that a lack of exposure to the outdoors can lead to obesity, ADHD, anxiety and depression.”

It’s no secret that kids are going and playing outside less and less today, given the increasing popularity of technology.

Luckily for his Severance, Colorado, hometown of about 6,000 people, the courageous third grader took a step in the right direction — and it may help parents get their kids outside for some exciting physical activity this winter disguised as play time.

Best showed up to his local town hall on Monday night decked out in a peach-colored button-down, accessorized with his father’s bowtie, and proceeded to present his case in front of about 150 people.

With a five-minute PowerPoint presentation at the ready, as well as letters from students and teachers of Range View Elementary, the 9-year-old Best won over the board.

He pointed out that the law was simply outdated.

“The children of Severance want the opportunity to have a snowball fight like the rest of the world,” the boy said.

The board trustees voted unanimously to lift the ban — and when that happened, the crowd erupted with excitement and applause.

In addition to his big win, Best was awarded with a plaque and a gift card — to buy his very own snowball maker by the mayor himself.

Standing outside the town hall, besieged by reporters and television cameras, Dane was presented with the town’s first legal snowball.

“The children of Severance want the opportunity to have a snowball fight like the rest of the world,” the boy said.

The town hero cocked his arm back — and launched it as far as he could, earning yet another round of applause.

When asked who his first “legal” target of his snowball throwing would be, Best gave the obvious answer: his 4-year-old brother.

Dane concluded by speaking of what he’s taken away from the whole ordeal.

“You can change laws. It doesn’t matter how old you are. You can have a voice in your town,” he said.