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Constitutional Freedoms

You’ll Never Guess What Kavanaugh Accuser Christine Blasey Ford Did with Her GoFundMe Money

California psychologist accumulated over $600,000

Christine Blasey Ford used some of the more than $600,000 donated to her after she came forward to accuse Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault to pay for security and housing.

She shared this information in a rare public statement.

She also said that “the funds you have sent through GoFundMe have been a godsend.”

“Your donations have allowed us to take reasonable steps to protect ourselves against frightening threats, including physical protection and security for me and my family, and to enhance the security for our home.”

Fox News and other sites reported the information on Tuesday morning.

She also wrote, “Words are not adequate to thank all of you who supported me since I came forward to tell the Senate that I had been sexually assaulted by Brett Kavanaugh. Because of your support, I feel hopeful that our lives will return to normal.”

Ford infamously accused then-judge Brett M. Kavanaugh — nominated to the high court by President Donald Trump in early July — of engaging in sexual misconduct against her several decades ago, when they were both young high school teenagers in the Washington, D.C, area.

Her accusations made waves just days before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, chaired by Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), was about to vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

Ford claimed that years ago, Kavanaugh threw her on a bed in an upstairs bedroom of a house in Maryland, where she had gone for a party in the early 1980s.

She alleged that he tried to remove her clothes and that he put his hand over her mouth when she attempted to scream.

She said another man was in the room with them at the time.

Ford also said that Kavanaugh was drunk at the time of the incident.

Kavanaugh vehemently and consistently denied that such a thing ever happened.

The man said to be in the room, Mark Judge, also could not corroborate the event.

After a televised series of hearings featuring both Ford and Kavanaugh that riveted millions, the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh to the bench on October 6.

After the allegations, a GoFundMe account was set up on Ford’s behalf — and it raised over $647,000 before it was closed to any further donations.

She also noted that the money went for a home security system, a security service and housing while her family was “displaced.”

In a November 21 statement posted to the fundraising page, Ford said she used the money “to protect ourselves against frightening threats, including physical protection and security for me and my family, and to enhance the security for our home.”

She also noted that the money went for a home security system, a security service and housing while her family was “displaced.”

She said at one point that her family was able to stay “in a residence generously loaned to us,” as Fox News reported.

The money that is left over from this fund will be donated to “organizations that support trauma survivors” — although those are yet to be determined, according to Ford.

Ford said that “although coming forward was terrifying, and caused disruption to our lives, I am grateful to have had the opportunity to fulfill my civic duty.”

“Having done so,” she added, “I am in awe of the many women and men who have written me to share similar life experiences, and now have bravely shared their experience with friends and family, many for the first time.”

A GoFundMe account was also set up in support of Kavanaugh by his supporters, and it raised nearly $489,000 before it stopped accepting any further donations.

From the beginning of the campaign, it was understood that if the Kavanaughs couldn’t or wouldn’t take the funds, that the money would be donated to a charity.

“I did some research on charities supported by the judge and settled on the Archdiocese of Washington, which runs the Catholic Youth Organization (CYO),” said John Hawkins, a conservative who organized the campaign for the Kavanaugh family after the Ford charges were made public.

“Brett Kavanaugh rather famously coached girls’ basketball there and if the Kavanaugh family were allowed to support a charity, I feel confident the Archdiocese of Washington would be near the top of the list. After talking to the Archdiocese of Washington about the best way to use the funds to help the sort of kids Brett Kavanaugh has been working with, we’re going to split the money between three of their programs: The Catholic Youth Organization (CYO), the Tuition Assistance Fund, and the Victory Youth Center.”

Neither Kavanaugh nor his family was able to accept any of the money raised on the site due to “judicial ethics reasons,” according to a statement posted on the fundraising page.

The money was indeed donated to the Archdiocese of Washington, according to the statement.

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