HealthZette

Shocking Video: From the Trash Can to Your Dinner Table

One popular fish, cut open in Costa Rica, yielded many pieces of plastic and other garbage from its stomach — 'pretty worrying,' says expert

Fish innards are off-putting on their own — but they become even more troubling when they’re filled with garbage.

That’s exactly what one angler claims he found during a fishing trip in Costa Rica, after cutting open the stomach of a mahi-mahi that he suspected to be sick.

Upon slicing open the mahi-mahi — or dolphinfish, as it’s also known — the fisherman captured footage of himself pulling out several pieces of plastic and other discarded materials, including bottle caps, bits of plastic, a mangled comb, and what appears to be a cigarette lighter.

“It’s a pretty worrying video,” said marine scientist Erick Ross, via Newsflare. “This confirms that different marine animals confuse plastic with food. The plastic does not melt and can block their intestinal tract, and then they cannot feed — preventing them from consuming food, and starving [them to death].”

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The video, which was taken in early December, has reportedly prompted concern from wildlife groups and environmentalists in Costa Rica as well, who point to the footage as evidence of rising pollution levels that may threaten their fishing industries.

Related: Watch Out: Could Sushi Have These Intestinal Parasites?

The fisherman’s footage was also filmed shortly before U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May pledged to drastically reduce plastic waste in the U.K. by 2042, citing data that one in three fish caught in the English Channel contained plastic fragments, reports Reuters.

This Fox News piece is used by permission.

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(photo credit, homepage image: Garbage on the beach in Les Cayes, CC BY-ND 2.0, by Norway UN (New York)