Politics

Wall Street Prefers Hillary

Billionaires 'will be outright hostile to a Trump candidacy'

Who will the billionaire donors funding Republican Jeb Bush’s presidential campaign support if maverick Donald Trump wins the GOP presidential nomination?

In a frank and somewhat surprising exchange Thursday on “The Laura Ingraham Show,” a political strategist who represents some of those billionaires said Democrat Hillary Clinton.

“It’s more than Wall Street just being ambivalent,” said Greg Valliere, chief political strategist at the Potomac Research Group. “I think Wall Street will be outright hostile to a Trump candidacy.”

Ingraham pressed him, asking him to admit that they would vote for Clinton.

“Yeah, I agree,” he said. “I agree. You’re absolutely right.”

Valliere’s company bills itself as “connecting Washington and Wall Street.” He has called Trump a “Benedict Arnold”and a “class traitor” for his calls to raise taxes on wealthy people who earn their income from investments.

“I think a lot of Wall Street is beginning to really worry about Trump, that he is a class traitor,” he told Ingraham. “He’s talking about flat tax and how Wall Street hedge fund people should be forced to pay more taxes.

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“I think a lot of Wall Street is beginning to really worry about Trump, that he is a class traitor,” he told Ingraham. “He’s talking about flat tax and how Wall Street hedge fund people should be forced to pay more taxes. I understand what he’s saying, but an awful lot of people on Wall Street are starting to think, is this Donald Trump — or Elizabeth Warren? Is Trump in the right party if he’s saying this kind of stuff?”

Critiquing the Wednesday night GOP debate, Valliere said he thought Trump — the oldest candidate in the race — seemed like he was “out of gas” by the end of the long battle.

While Bush, the former Florida governor, has floundered for much the campaign, Valliere said his supporters saw some signs up hope in his performance. Perhaps, they won’t have to defect to Clinton, after all.

“Maybe he switched (from) decaf to regular coffee,” he said. “I wouldn’t say he was great last night. But he’s still in the game. I think his supporters this morning are breathing a sigh of relief.”

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