Ingraham: GOP Leaders Need to ‘Get Off Their Derrieres’

LifeZette Editor-in-Chief Laura Ingraham said the pressure is on for GOP congressional leaders to capitalize on President Donald Trump’s successful foreign trip and get moving on the president’s agenda, during an appearance Tuesday on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends.”

Noting that she does “a lot of appearances across the country,” Ingraham insisted that “the number-one thing that people come up and say to me is, when is Congress going to get itself in gear and push through the Trump agenda?”

“We are reasserting America’s role in the world and America’s focus on the home front. That is a good thing. It’s across the board a good thing.”

“And I think that’s where the pressure needs to be put now,” Ingraham added. “The White House has done unbelievable work already without the help of Congress. But now the pressure needs to go to [House Speaker] Paul Ryan [and Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell to get off their derrieres and get this agenda pushed through. That’s what’s going to drive this economic renewal, and that’s what’s going to make all these investigations, I think, in eventuality look like they’re, you know, frankly quite irrelevant. Because this economy’s going to get going, and that’s going to be the best thing for the country and for the president.”

Ingraham noted the president “has a lot of barricades to jump over” — including the press, the Democratic Party, and the Never-Trumpers in the Republican establishment. She said that Trump’s successful first overseas trip helped to boost his image and turn the narrative in a more positive direction.

The media, however, have been focusing on German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s comments made after she met with Trump and the NATO and G-7 leaders. Merkel said, “The times in which we could completely depend on others are, to a certain extent, over,” adding, “I’ve experienced that in the last few days. We Europeans truly have to take our fate into our own hands.”

Ingraham insisted that Merkel's reaction provided a mandate for Trump to continue with his "America first" agenda.

"I, for one, am ecstatic that the Europeans are now having to face this bizarre concept, this unusual concept of actually paying their fair share of their own defense," Ingraham said. "I think it's about time that we had an American president that said, 'We love our alliance,' which he said. But you can't put it all on the backs of the American taxpayers."

"And I think the fact that Merkel said that is a great sign for Donald Trump," Ingraham added. "Merkel's reaction is the typical reaction of an individual who realizes that, 'Oh wait, no longer are the people going to played for suckers. Oops. We've actually got to pay our fair share.'"

Ingraham also urged Trump to withdraw the U.S. from the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, after reports circulated over the weekend indicating that he would do so.

"But right now, he has to keep his eye on what is going to be a drag on the economy, get rid of it, and move forward with economic renewal. That's what he has to do," Ingraham said, adding that remaining in the accord would "be an albatross around the American economy's neck. He can't let that happen."

"It would be a complete betrayal of his base and a betrayal of his message, which was American sovereignty first, the American economy first, America first," Ingraham said. "Maybe in the future we can renegotiate in a way that would be actually beneficial to the United States and sensitive to, you know, climate concerns. But this treaty, the way this was negotiated, is a drag on the U.S. economy."

"We are reasserting America's role in the world and America's focus on the home front," Ingraham said. "That is a good thing. It's across the board a good thing."

Ingraham also downplayed the news Tuesday that White House communications director Mike Dubke had resigned, saying these types of "shakeouts are routine."

Dubke reportedly offered his resignation prior to President Donald Trump's first overseas trip last week but agreed to stay on until the president returned.

"It doesn't surprise me. I don't think it's that big of a deal. I think they're learning about how they need to hone their communication skills, marry policies with events," Ingraham said. "These kinds of shakeouts are routine, frankly. And this is a high intensity — the high impact, you know, four or five months here."

Ingraham recommended Trump's communications team move forward with a positive message and take control of the negative narrative permeating throughout the mainstream media.

"So, for instance, last week we learned that 30,000 criminal aliens, including MS-13 members, had been deported from the country since Trump took over. That's great news," Ingraham said. "You know, I would like to see Trump go to Manassas, Virginia, and sit with a family for 15 minutes that had to deal with the MS-13 violence and go visit a police station and say, 'Guys, thank you for everything you're doing.'"

"That's the kind of work I think they're going to start doing at the White House," Ingraham said. "You saw it in the foreign trip. It worked fabulously."

Ingraham also noted the president struck a "positive and patriotic and hopeful" tone when he spoke at a Memorial Day service in Arlington on Monday.

That is what we want to see from our president," Ingraham said, noting that the Democrats and the media will continue to "salivate every time the word 'Russia' is mentioned" in connection with Trump and his officials during the ongoing investigation into foreign contacts during the 2016 presidential campaign.

"These investigations should go forward. I hope they're going to be expeditiously handled. But they need to stay on message," Ingraham said. "And from my sense and my sources inside the White House, that is what they're in the process of doing. It's not going to happen overnight. Nothing does."

Last Modified: July 14, 2017, 12:49 pm

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