Opinion

Parent Records Teacher Berating President Trump to His MS Class

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Some troubling incidents have happened recently that shows just how successful public schools have been with their leftist indoctrination of students over the past few decades. Teachers don’t seem to know the boundaries of political partisanship. Oddly, The COVID overreaction in blue states has resulted in some unexpected circumstances that are exposing teachers who are teaching their students lessons, during online learning, about how not to teach.

For example, a Tacoma, Washington teacher has gotten himself into a bit of a jam, recently. As reported by Louis Casiano of FOX News, while teaching his sixth-grade class online, Brendan Stanton asked his students to name someone they admire and say why. The students were to post their choices in the class chat room.

One student typed, “I admire Donald J. Trump because he is making America great again. And because he is the best president the United States of America could ever, ever have. And he built the wall so terrorists couldn’t come into the U.S. Trump is the best person in the world. And that’s why I had admire him.” You may not agree, but that is a legitimate answer, right? Well, as it turns out, only if you have integrity and are intellectually honest.

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Reportedly, Stanton kicked the student out of the online class, though there are some reports he just ended and erased the chat rather than specifically booting the student out. Regardless, this middle school teacher rebuked the child for his choice of President Trump as the person he most admired. According to his teacher, 10-year-old, sixth-graders are not allowed to admire their president.

Casiano wrote to his students, “The example that was shared in the chat, which I went ahead and erased for us, was not appropriate, right?” Stanton told the class. “Especially as that individual has created so much division and hatred between people and specifically spoken hatred to many different individuals, OK?” We might be tempted to chuckle at the stupidity of this so-called teacher, but this kind of toxic education of our children is utterly atrocious.

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This is where the sixth-grader’s mom gets involved. Elsy Kusander had been listening to the class from another room. She called the teacher to ask why he’d berated her son for his choice. She recorded their conversation of which she informed Stanton. She asked about his anti-Trump comments and said, “No matter what party of what side of politics you’re on, you have to respect the Office of the President.”

Kusander said, “He [Stanton] referred to Trump, without saying his name, as an ‘individual’ who ‘has spoken hate to many individuals and I don’t think is an appropriate example for a role model that we should be admiring.’” Who does this guy think he is? A disgrace is one thing he is.

Stanton told Kusander Trump wasn’t an appropriate choice because he’d asked the students to select “a computer programmer they admired.” He added the students could have also picked a community member they admired. Okay, but is that actually what he said?

Then Kusander told Stanton he’d asked the students a much broader question than about computer programmers or community members.

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How did she know?

Turns out, when she heard what the teacher was saying, she began recording the class on her phone. She knew the true assignment because she’d heard him say it. Then, this Tacoma teacher became slipperier than a slug dipped in olive oil (northwest reference).

Stanton said he’d deleted her son’s selection of Trump, in part, because “another student was offended by her son’s answer…” How convenient. Besides, so what? The teacher said he, “deleted the question because of privacy concerns.” Sure. But he gets even slipperier (must have been extra-virgin olive oil).

According to Kusander’s recording of their conversation, Stanton said, “My perspective has nothing to do with Donald Trump himself, right? I try to keep politics out of the classroom.”

Okay, I’m just going to say it, “Liar!”

He continued to leave a slime trail on the phone conversation, saying, “I do try to keep politics out of the classroom… because students have different opinions, right? And so, if the way that I said it was not perfect, I do apologize. What I was trying to say is just ‘Hey, hey, guys, let’s get it back to our topic of the day because we really need to get moving into our content, which was on our computer scientists.’” “Not perfect?” Slither, slither, slither.

It’s notable the teacher did not offer to apologize to the mother or offer to apologize to her son until Kusander had told him she’d recorded what he’d said.

The striking part of this story is the teacher seemed to have only an inkling that what he’d done was wrong. There was a time when teachers, even those who were politically partisan, were well aware of the ethics of not imposing your political ideology on your students. Today, too many teachers seem to act as if their responsibility to teach your kids, not how to think, but what to think. They act like referees who see no problem with siding with one team.

But that’s what several decades of leftist propaganda and indoctrination in our public schools K thru post-grad seem to have done. These stories appear to be happening somewhere in America every day.

Hang on, I saved the best part of the story for last—although the part about Stanton lying when he didn’t know Kusander had recorded him was pretty good. During their conversation, Stanton apparently tried to reach what he thought might be Kusander’s inner-Trump hater (everyone must have one, right?). He didn’t come close.

After noting “her son’s comments about Trump’s much-promised border wall,” the teacher asked mom (condescendingly), “But we know that our neighbors at the southern border are not all terrorists, right?”

Kusander, “who is from Honduras, said the wall doesn’t bother her.”

meet the author

Steve Pomper is a retired Seattle police officer. He's served as a field training officer and on the East Precinct Community Police Team. He's the author of four books, including "De-Policing America: A Street Cop's View of the Anti-Police State." He's also a contributor to the National Police Association.

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