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Truckers refuse delivering consumer goods in cities declaring to ‘defund the police’

So it seems cops and truckers have that one thing in common, and can readily relate to the potential of going on the road and not coming home.

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Truckers across the country were courageous enough to bring Americans a sought-after supply of goods after the COVID pandemic created a shortage. Commercial truck drivers had the manifest means of protecting themselves, donning face masks and gloves to effectuate their route and make deliveries to retailers whose consumers were hungry for just about anything.

With COVID subsided to a degree or two, America’s newest commerce-forestalling factor is the existence of so-called “peaceful protests” transpiring in jurisdictions all across the nation. Despite some politicians feigning pride in their respective city for peaceful protests, violence has undeniably ensued in myriad locales across the United States. And that hostile behavior which already culminated in violence and murder of both cops and citizens has truckers on edge. Who can blame them for not wanting to go in to ostensibly urban terror situations to deliver bread and goods to retailers already besieged by otherwise avoidable human volatility?

Just look at what is being allowed to fester in Seattle, with anarchists effectively declaring ownership of roughly six city streets and hijacking the Seattle Police East Precinct as their so-called “community center.” Signs delineating a “cop-free zone” are fastened to impromptu chain-link fencing rolled out to demarcate territorial boundaries, all without government permitting and with largely tacit approval my Mayor Jenny Durkan and Police Chief Carmen Best. For a police executive to go on live TV news and state her police department is hampered from getting to crime victims in an Antifa-controlled portion of property belonging to lawful tax-payers is absurd, but it happened.

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No truck driver would care to be anywhere in or near “Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone” (CHAZ), the self-titled geography Antifa and like-minded folks took hostage and named to their ilk’s liking. Seattle is one such city pushing the “defund the police” platform; no surprise since it is a long-held anti-police liberal-operated government.

According to trucking news publication CDL Life News, “Seventy-seven percent of truck drivers say they will refuse to deliver freight to cities with defunded police departments,” voicing safety concerns in general, mostly emphasized in jurisdictions who want to divorce the law enforcement community. “Truck driving is historically ranked as one of the most dangerous jobs in the country. In 2018, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistic reported truck driving as the most deadly job in the country,” CDL Life News explained. So it seems cops and truckers have that one thing in common, and can readily relate to the potential of going on the road and not coming home.

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In response to a CDL Life News survey of commercial driver’s license holders, one said that “…if something was to happen and you have to take matters into your own hands, and then you risk being prosecuted for protecting yourself.” There is yet another circumstance truckers and cops have in common.

Another trucker told CDL Life News, “Simple. We may not like it all the time, but laws and order is necessary.” Seems Seattle and other out-of-control cities may have forgotten that traditional tidbit inherent in American society, and no where does it say commandeering city streets/buildings and privately-owned trucks loaded with cargo for law-abiding consumers is acceptable (unless you’re Seattle Mayor Durkan or her police chief giving unruly barbarians keys to the city).

 

meet the author

Stephen Owsinski is a LifeZette contributing editor. Owsinski is a retired law enforcement officer whose career included assignments in the Uniformed Patrol Division and Field Training Officer (FTO) unit. He is also a columnist for the National Police Association.

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