Politics

Greater Idaho? Conservative Oregon wants to be part of the ‘Gem State’

Other states have sought similar changes.

Image Credit: Screenshot The Greater Idaho Group

The cry is heard from New York to California, in Virginia and Maryland. And now, Oregon.

Highly populated Democrat bastions are calling the political tunes for entire states, states that also have a significant amount of conservative voters.

In New York it’s upstate versus Manhattan. Northern California has an issue with the Bay Area and L.A. Virginia and Maryland feel that areas that are adjacent to DC have too much influence in state politics. Oregon takes a different approach. Its rebellious conservatives want to join Idaho.

“Rural counties have become increasingly outraged by laws coming out of the Oregon Legislature that threaten our livelihoods, our industries, our wallet, our gun rights, and our values. We tried voting those legislators out but rural Oregon is outnumbered and our voices are now ignored. This is our last resort.” said conservative activist Mike McCarter, who is fighting for Oregon counties to leave the state and join more conservative Idaho. They want to accomplish their goal by moving Oregon’s border with Idaho west to encompass the 24 Oregon counties of what would then be called “Greater Idaho.”

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“People here would prefer Idaho’s conservative governance to the progressive/liberal current Oregon governance. Every time I look at the Facebook group Greater Idaho, the group has gotten bigger,” commented Valerie Gottschalk, a leader in the movement to leave Oregon for Idaho.

For the move to succeed the action would have to be approved by Congress and then by the state legislatures of both states. The chances for these things to happen are dodgy at best.

If the liberal Oregon legislature is getting their own way, why would they give themselves this headache and decrease the tax revenues that would go to Idaho in the event of those 24 counties leaving?

While the map of the U.S., like the maps of many nations, will likely change over time, it will take more than a relatively few disgruntled citizens of any ideology to effect the change. As in most changes, the impetus will come from a mass movement that can win at the ballot box.

So far, that is not the case in any of the states mentioned above.

Yet.

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