Politics

As Pelosi Delays on Impeachment Articles, Canny McConnell Is Lying in Wait

GOP's Senate Majority leader will not be put off by Dem speaker's shameful actions

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The Democratic action in the three-act play to remove President Donald Trump from the White House now switches to the final act in the Senate.

The first act started soon after the American people elected Trump in 2016, more than three years ago now.

Related: GOP and Dems Each Eye Key Senators for Trump Vote

That is the point at which Dems started plotting impeachment and removal.

The public record proves that.

The Dem House majority for impeachment acted out their scripted roles in the second act, as their plot came to fruition and ended on Wednesday night (last night) on the vote to impeach the president.

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Now comes the grand finale.

The scene moves to the Senate, which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) knows she can’t win at this moment.

So she, apparently, is going to delay delivering the articles of impeachment, using the hilariously hypocritical concern for due process and bias and biding time in order to give her hard-Left, street-agitator base a chance to put their campaign of pressure into effect.

The nation will see some old faces from Moveon.org, the Occupy group, and others.

It will also see new groups formed by the Dems, expressly for the purpose of politically coercing GOP senators to vote Trump “guilty” and ensuring Dem senators hold the total party line on their votes against the president.

They have their work cut out for them — as current numbers show the Dems 10 to 14 votes short of the 67 guilty votes they need for removal.

And that is a worst-case number for the GOP.

The speaker will further rationalize her interlude by referring to the move of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in 2016 of delaying for months until Trump’s election — when it effectively died on the vine — the Obama administration Supreme Court nomination of Judge Merrick Garland.

Related: GOP and Dems Each Eye Key Senators for Trump Vote

It’s true that a presidential removal from office far exceeds in gravity a nomination to the high court.

But Pelosi will call an apple an orange and proceed forthwith.

Still, this will only give her so much time until her own party starts to chomp at the bit to go to the Senate to avoid charges of partisan procrastination in an election year.

When she does — as she must, or see a Trump administration court challenge to her authority to delay — the Trump team knows the Constitution vests sole trial authority in the Senate.

It is likely that if she delays too much, she will pay at next year’s November polls.

When the Senate begins its debate (probably in January some time, though this is up in the air at the moment), Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) could try to get a simple majority of 51 for procedural changes — and then argue the rules should be changed to allow him relative carte blanche in the name of “fairness.”

He’d need only four GOP votes to do that — and he’d have to do it with a straight face.

But it is a desperate late-in-the-game ploy. The most he would probably get out of that maneuver would be a press-amplified talking point.

Facing Schumer in this Capitol Hill showdown is the president, his legal team, and most of all — perhaps the shrewdest operator on the Hill — McConnell himself.

The canny GOP Senate leader will not go down in congressional and national history as a coach who blew a lead like this.

As such, he is ready and waiting for the Dems to come on over to the Senate.

When they do, they can expect the worst. It will be fair play for their actions in the House.

David Kamioner
meet the author

David Kamioner is a veteran of U.S. Army Intelligence and an honors graduate of the University of Maryland's European Division. He also served with the Pershing Nuclear Brigade and the First Infantry Division. Subsequent to that he worked for two decades as a political consultant, was part of the American Red Cross Hurricane Katrina disaster relief effort in Louisiana, ran a homeless shelter for veterans in Philadelphia, and taught as a college instructor. He serves as a Contributing Editor for LifeZette.

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