Election 2020

Bill de Blasio Worked at City Hall for Just Seven Hours in May (He Won’t Be Debating Next Week)

A review of records by The New York Post about the Big Apple's mayor and struggling 2020 Democratic candidate is compelling — yet there seems to be little outrage

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio is accused of logging a mere seven hours of his mayoral duties in May of this year — the month he entered the 2020 Democratic presidential race — according to a review of records by The New York Post in a piece it published on Tuesday.

The mayor reportedly showed up to City Hall just six times in May.

During those instances, he took part in “in two meetings, four events and five phone calls, one of which was his weekly appearance on WNYC radio,” The Post reported.

Compare that “performance” to what was actually on his calendar for May 2019, according to the same report.

“The 11 appointments [he did attend in May 2019] amounted to a meager one-fifth of the 50 meetings, calls and other events at City Hall on de Blasio’s calendar for May 2019,” The Post reported. “He had a total 152 city events scheduled for the month.”

A former aide declared those actions troubling. “If he’s trying to show New Yorkers that he’s overdoing the job, he’s doing a good job of it,” that ex-aide said of the mayor’s absence, as The Post reported.

“This was the month [May 2019] he launched his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination,” The Post subsequently pointed out in an editorial about the issue. “And he’s been campaigning (and fundraising) vigorously ever since, so it’s all too likely that the records for June, July and August will show a similar work ethic.”

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“Yes, he does some work from home (whenever he chooses) and even phones from the road occasionally,” The Post’s editorial also noted. “In case of a blackout or other civic crisis, he’ll rush back to town within a day or so, with just a stop or two on the way to engage the national media.”

De Blasio, a candidate for the 2020 Democratic nomination, did not make the cut for the candidates’ debate in Houston next week on September 12.

It is the third debate the Democratic candidates will be participating in during this election cycle — 10 of them will be together on the stage for the first time.

Here’s how columnist Michael Goodwin, in a Wednesday morning piece in The New York Post, described what’s going on in New York City: “In a vigilant city, The Post’s report that Mayor de Blasio appeared at his City Hall office for just seven hours — yes, seven hours! — in May would send shock waves through the civic arteries. Business, educational and political leaders would be denouncing the blatant derelictions of duty and the dangerous signal it sends to other municipal workers.”

“He’s neglecting the best job he’ll ever have in a bid for a job he’ll never get.”

He goes on: “Good-government groups, which used to be a potent force, would be furious, noting that seven hours is not even a full day’s work. They would demand to know how de Blasio could possibly think he could travel the country in a fool’s quest for the presidency and still manage the largest city in America, with a budget of $92.2 billion and more than 300,000 employees.”

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He notes, too, that de Blasio earns $258,750 a year as mayor — and gets free housing for his family at Gracie Mansion.

But, no: “Faced with proof its mayor no longer cares about his day job, the city shrugs its collective shoulders and gives de Blasio a pass, with the lack of public outrage the enabling element that makes his scam possible.”

Goodwin, in his column, makes this point as well: “As I noted, he’s neglecting the best job he’ll ever have in a bid for a job he’ll never get.”

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