Politics

Pelosi Has Largest Negativity Rating After Shutdown, Poll Finds

New numbers from NBC and The Wall Street Journal indicate that every party and politician is viewed less optimistically by Americans after the closure

Image Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

A new poll from NBC and the Wall Street Journal shows that every party and politician is being viewed negatively by Americans after the partial government shutdown — but Nancy Pelosi remains the most underwater.

It is an interesting number to note amid a sea of media coverage indicating President Donald Trump lost the shutdown battle to the House speaker.

The survey found that just 28 percent of respondents viewed Pelosi positively after the shutdown, while 47 percent held a negative view — a 19-point negativity rating.

By comparison, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) was given an 18-point negativity rating, while President Trump sat at 12 points.

Party-wise, the Republicans were 9 points underwater, while the Democrats were 5 points so.

The only group that came out with a positive rating were the federal government workers themselves, who had a whopping 54-point positivity rating according to the poll.

Trump also gets bad news. The poll is difficult to look at in a positive light for the president, despite Pelosi’s having a wider gap in voters’ feelings toward her.

Trump still leads the way with an overall 51 percent negative clip. His 39 percent total positive rating does, however, put him well ahead of Pelosi, McConnell, and both political parties.

Still, Americans soured on the direction of the nation in the midst of the shutdown, something illustrated by the fact that every entity inquired about has low favorability numbers.

“After the longest partial government shutdown in U.S. history, six-in-10 Americans believe the country is headed in the wrong direction, and nearly 70 percent of them have negative opinions on the state of the nation today,” Mark Murray of NBC News wrote.

The shutdown, it seems clear, hurt the nation, at the very least in optimism for the direction we are heading.

But that reflects on both sides of the aisle.

Will we be back here again? Things may get worse before they get better.

If the nation has grown worried about the state of affairs in America after the shutdown, what’s going to happen just over two weeks from now, when the CR (continuing resolution) runs out and we’re back to debating border security once more?

Trump recently told The Wall Street Journal that the chances of coming to an agreement by then were “less than 50-50.”

Last week, Trump closed his announcement of the end of the shutdown by stating, “If we don’t get a fair deal from Congress, the government will either shut down on February 15, again, or I will use the powers afforded to me.”

Related: Border Patrol Wives Invite Pelosi to Visit Them in Texas

Trump has continually noted his ability to declare a national emergency at the border, but has been, thus far, hesitant to go down that path.

It might just be the only solution to circumvent obstructionists in Congress.

This article originally appeared in The Political Insider and is used by permission.

Read more at ThePoliticalInsider.com:
Trump Prepares National Emergency Declaration as Pelosi Rejects Another Shutdown Compromise
Dems Celebrate Trump ‘Caving’ on Border Wall
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Says She Won’t Shake Trump’s Hand at State of the Union

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