If you have a Netflix account, you may want to keep an eye out for a fairly convincing email that is a scam.

“We’re having some trouble with your current billing information,” the email says. “We’ll try again, but in the meantime you may want to update your payment details.”

There is then the option to “update account now.”

The email also informs the receiver that his or her Netflix account is “on hold.”

The trouble is, many people have been receiving the email who do not even have Netflix accounts.

Ohio’s Solon Police Department warned of the scam recently through its Facebook page.

“We talk about scams from time to time. Here’s an example of an email phishing attempt that I received. (Biggest clue is that I don’t have a Netflix account),” the post from the police department read — and it was published with an image of the email.

“Criminals want you to click the links, so that you voluntarily give your personal identifying information away. It is very successful. Don’t put your guard down. Contact the source of the email by another method that you trust, to make sure your accounts are maintained. Don’t click the links. The links could also be a way to install malware on your computer.”

One big clue that this so-called email from Netflix is a scam is if the email does not use your actual name. A scam email will often use a generic word to address you instead of your actual name.

You can also hover over — with your cursor — whatever link is provided in the email.

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You should then should be able to see the web address the link will send you to before you ever click. That link should flag whether the email is legitimate or fake.

Netflix warns customers on its official website that people should “never enter [their] login or financial details after following a link in an email or text message.”

“I learned, while working in a bank, that you NEVER click on a link coming from a bank even if you have accounts there. Always go to a trusted address and see what’s going on. If there is nothing there, it’s probably a scam. Calling the institution to check it out is a good way, too,” one user commented.

It also says customers should never “click on any links or open any attachments.”

“I learned, while working in a bank, that you NEVER click on a link coming from a bank even if you have accounts there. Always go to a trusted address and see what’s going on. If there is nothing there, it’s probably a scam. Calling the institution to check it out is a good way, too,” one user commented about the new scam on Facebook.

Another responded, “I knew something was wrong. I don’t have a Netflix.”