Traditional Values

Millennials Could Put Christmas Tree Farms in the Black

'Fake decorations' are so yesterday — young people favor fresh, green pine over stale, cheap plastic

Ready or not, the holiday season is now upon us — and that means, for those of us who celebrate Christmas, that it’s time right about now to think about buying and putting up this year’s Christmas tree.

In past years, the fake tree market has trended upward.

But environmentally conscious millennials seem to be turning the tables on that now.

Square Inc. (NYSE: SQ) — along with The National Christmas Tree Association (NCTA) — made a recent announcement about the analytics of their sales of numerous Christmas tree farmers and sellers nationwide, as 24WallStreet.com reported.

As millennials moved out of the homes of their baby boomer parents and made their own way, the sales of fake and plastic trees had seemed to go up as the demand for real, natural trees declined.

However, millennials are all grown up now — and it appears they’re leading a revival of the real tree industry, exhibiting a general preference for all things natural and environmentally friendly.

Data from the Square report show that average tree prices jumped from $64 to $73, a 17 percent increase from 2015 to 2017. The executive director of the National Christmas Tree Association, Tim O’Connor, released a statement on the trends.

“While prices have increased over the past two years, this is the first time in more than a decade that many local tree farmers are profitable,” he said.

Local tree farmers are welcoming these millennial consumers with open arms, as they often pursue the perfect snapshot of themselves and their loved ones as they pick out or cut down their own emblem of Christmas.

“Now more than ever, we hope to see families support American Christmas tree farmers, and create their own holiday tradition and family memories of choosing a locally grown tree this Christmas.”

Local tree farmers are welcoming these millennial consumers with open arms, as they often pursue the perfect snapshot of themselves and their loved ones as they pick out or cut down their own emblem of Christmas.

And when they post those happy pictures on social media — that makes for some great (and some free) advertising.

Christmas tree sales usually ramp up on Black Friday (November 23 this year) and sell for an average of $77 each, data show.

The average prices are said to increase on Cyber Monday (November 26 this year) to about $81.

Although the kids will most likely not approve of this buy, in the week leading up to Christmas there’s a predicted 22 percent decrease in price — while the price of trees on Christmas Eve is said to reach an all-time low at around $47.

The National Christmas Tree Association acts as the representative for the farm-grown Christmas tree industry.

This includes thousands of associated businesses, 29 regional and state associations, and hundreds of active farms.

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