Entertainment

Liberals Say Mel Gibson’s Latest Film Is ‘Vile, Racist, Right-Wing Fantasy’

'Dragged Across Concrete,' which recently debuted at the Venice Film Festival, is already angering 'woke' leftists

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Those on the Left are already labeling Mel Gibson’s latest movie as “aggressively right-wing” and “racist.”

“Dragged Across Concrete,” which recently debuted at the Venice Film Festival, follows two detectives (Gibson and Vince Vaughn) suspended from the force when a video of them roughing up a drug dealer goes viral.

Desperate for money, the two agree to get involved in a bank robbery.

Written and directed by S. Craig Zahler (“Bone Tomahawk,” “Brawl in Cell Block 99”), the film features scenes of intense violence and dialogue that is heavily politically incorrect.

Leftists are none too happy with this feature.

“Mel Gibson’s new police brutality movie is a vile, racist, right-wing fantasy,” read the headline on The Daily Beast’s review.

The rambling critique also said Gibson is the Right’s “Oprah” and charged that “Dragged Across Concrete” is “a cold-blooded saga that revels in the violence it inflicts on women and minorities, in particular.”

John Nugent, a news editor at Empire Magazine, also accused the film on Twitter of being “aggressively right-wing.”

Critics seem to take issue with much of the film’s dialogue and themes.

Plenty of slurs are used in the film — which makes sense considering it’s about the criminal underworld — and Gibson’s character is an old hat struggling to keep up with a groupthink, socially authoritarian world.

“I don’t politick and I don’t change with the times,” his character reportedly says at one point in the film.

Don Johnson, as the movie’s chief of police, makes a speech as well that compares being labeled a “racist” in modern America to being labeled a “communist” in the ‘50s.

Zahler, whose films have never bowed to modern pressures from “woke” crowds, told reporters at a press conference that he doesn’t care if he offends certain audiences with his work: “I’m not chasing the biggest audience and I’m comfortable with losing some of them. There are obviously remarks that are throwaway jokes and there are lines that aren’t politically correct. There are lines that will get people to hate me, and that is your right to do so.”

The Daily Beast review ended with that quote above, almost as a way of justifying its ridiculous accusations.

If the early reactions to “Dragged Across Concrete” suggest anything, it’s that the country is entering dangerous cultural waters. The hypersensitive are reaching a point where they don’t quite understand art.

Instead of absorbing a story and characters, they want sanitized content in which figures on the screen only say things that serve a larger, socially acceptable political agenda.

The truth is people don’t always say or do nice things; and art is about far more than the dialogue exchanged between actors.

Leftists desperate to be outraged about things seem to be more frequently turning on art that offends their sensibilities. They deprive the written word of context and meaning in order to simplify the world into Left and Right.

Not all of us want sanitized, politically driven content. Some of us crave artistic creations from people like Zahler, who have the ability to engineer works that confront and challenge us — as opposed to simply giving us a pat on the back for believing the right things.

If Zahler’s past work is any indication, “Concrete” will be a politically incorrect gut punch that refreshingly puts characters and story above larger social points.

If leftists want something to watch, they can stick to films like “First Man,” the upcoming Neil Armstrong film about the moon landing. It’s so desperate not to offend anyone or make a stand that it removed one of the most significant moments in history: the planting of the American flag on the moon.

Watch Vince Vaughn and S. Craig Zahler talk about “Dragged Across Concrete” below:

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