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Is Mooch Really Gone?

In Trump's world, the president rarely parts company with trusted advisers

Anthony Scaramucci, the sacked White House communications director, walked out of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, where he was confronted by a TMZ reporter and cameraman, who’d staked out the hotel.

“What’s your best advice for the new communications director coming in?” the reporter asked.

“It’s not appropriate for me to comment right now,” Scaramucci responded, while crossing the street toward a black Chevy Suburban. “But I appreciate you being here, because I know you have a job to do.”

When asked what he was going to work on next, he said: “I’m working on bein’ the best person that I can be, and I want Chief of Staff Kelly to have an unbelievable opportunity inside the White House.”

And with that, he was off, apparently leaving the capital city for now.

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But Scaramucci is likely not gone. That’s because President Donald Trump has never truly gotten rid of any of his trusted advisers, even after subjecting them to the humiliation of a public firing.

Scaramucci is likely not even in the doghouse with Trump. It was widely reported that Trump wanted to bring Scaramucci into the White House to be an aggressive champion of the message, to fire leakers, and to bypass Reince Priebus, the chief of staff.

But then Scaramucci gave a expletive-laden interview to The New Yorker on Thursday. When Kelly got there Monday, he terminated Scaramucci.

It won’t be the end of the “Mooch.” Trump has been in regular contact with Scaramucci since the former investment banker interviewed for a job in the executive branch during the transition. Scaramucci was reportedly angry that Priebus blocked him for jobs in the administration.

It’s likely Scaramucci will keep the president’s cellphone number, and Trump will continue answering his calls. Why? Because Trump keeps old advisers around.

Roger Stone
Stone, a Florida-based consultant, is the best example of an adviser that Trump won’t quit.

After clashing with Trump’s former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, in the early days of Trump’s presidential campaign, Stone resigned.

Lewandowski reportedly tried to stop Trump from contacting him over the next few months, but could not stop Stone from reaching Trump, and vice versa.

Stone has said he still talks to President Trump and sends him memos. Stone is an old hand in Republican circles, but he has been particularly close to Trump. Maggie Haberman of The New York Times recently said that no consultant has as much to do with Trump’s steady rise as Stone.

And if Stone is unhappy with Trump’s direction or staffers, he calls the president.

Corey Lewandowski
Lewandowski “let Trump be Trump,” and the result was a smashing victory in the GOP presidential primaries in 2016.

But Trump’s family and Stone reportedly did not like Lewandowski’s style. Trump decided to change direction before the Republican National Convention, and fired Lewandowski in June 2016.

Lewandowski has been a surrogate on CNN and Fox News for Trump, and has recently been in the White House helping Trump strategize. Recently, Lewandowski also reportedly lobbied Congress to pass the Republican health care plan.

Sam Nunberg
Nunberg, a New York attorney, worked with Trump as an attorney long before his presidential run, but he ran afoul of Lewandowski.

Trump threatened to sue Nunberg after he left the campaign, but the men have patched up their differences. Nunberg was recently at the White House.

Michael Flynn
Flynn, a retired Army general, was Trump’s first national security adviser.

He was forced to resign on February 14, after highly sensitive leaked documents were sent to newspapers. The documents suggested Flynn misled Vice President Mike Pence on transition discussions with the Russians.

Trump does not speak of any present discussions he has with Flynn, because of the ongoing investigation in all matters Russian. But it’s likely the two have spoken, as reported. It’s also likely Flynn will come back into the fold of advisers when the investigation dies down.

meet the author

Political reporter, LifeZette. Indiana University journalism grad. Boston U. business grad. Former Indiana, Alabama statehouse reporter, Daytona Beach editorial writer.