Politics

What to Expect from Trump in 2017

A month-by-month look at what the president-elect may pursue his first year in office

President-Elect Donald Trump had built casinos and skyscrapers in cities as cutthroat as New York and Chicago when he ran for the White House. He shocked the Washington Establishment when he won.

Now his supporters expect him to deliver on a number of campaign promises. Trump will face pressure to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka ObamaCare, as soon as possible.

A major celebrity, maybe Alec Baldwin, will take his anti-Trump remarks too far, and is sent off to rehab, whether he needs it or not.

And while building “the wall” along the southern border will also be a priority, funding for new border barriers likely won’t be appropriated by Congress or handed over by the Mexican government overnight.

How exactly will 2017 unroll for the new president? Let’s engage in some speculation in when things happen, give or take eight weeks in some cases:

January
With inauguration fast approaching, President Obama decides to behave like a chief executive and stows his attitude. Trump coasts mostly controversy-free until he is sworn in.

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The media begins its full-on assault on repealing Obamacare. Journalists report over and over that the law is too entrenched to repeal and that millions would lose health care.

The swearing-in triggers a final tantrum by leftists, seeing Trump sworn in as he stands next to Obama. There are protests and hysterical reporting about Russian spying.

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Trump eschews long celebrations and says he has to get to work. He announces his choice to replace Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.

Trump revels in having CEOs visit, especially when they promise expansions of hiring. He announces every job expansion on Twitter.

February
Trump is called on by many foreign leaders seeking a new relationship from the United States. Leaders from Russia, Mexico, Canada, Europe, and some Arab states come to visit. Trump usually extracts policy concessions from them.

Trump gives his State of the Union address, and calls for more infrastructure spending, tax reform, and trade renegotiation.

Republicans in Congress gripe about the pressure they are under to adjust free trade agreements, which they supported in the past with few questions asked. They also gripe about the price tag on requests by Trump for roads, bridges, and new infrastructure.

Trump approves expansion of the Keystone XL oil pipeline as well as the Dakota Access pipeline. Celebrities erupt on media for one week.

March
Most of Trump’s nominations have been confirmed by the Senate.

No foreign policy incidents yet. North Korea seems afraid of angering Trump.

China protests statements from Trump about readdressing the U.S.-China relationship on trade. Trump also calls for the destruction of the man-made Chinese island in international waters in the South China Sea.

A major celebrity, maybe Alec Baldwin, will take his anti-Trump remarks too far, and is sent off to rehab, whether he needs it or not.

April
Congress is able to wrap up its tax reform early. But other fights make the senators rethink the filibuster rule.

Congress passes an instantaneous “repeal and replace” of Obamacare that slips in new policies the same day as Obamacare dies. It will take two to three years to take full effect.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, both Democrats, are criticized for not doing enough to “stop Trump.”

May
A second Supreme Court nominee is needed as a conservative justice announces retirement. Two in one year.

Trump again pressures China to tear apart the fake island in the South China Sea.

Democratic activists call for both Schumer and Pelosi to step down as congressional leaders.

June
The Dow Jones industrial average continues to test new ground.

Republicans in Congress pass a large infrastructure bill.

Trump turns 71.

July
North Korea demands Trump negotiate a new peace agreement with them.

Trump throws a major July 4 celebration in New York City.

Trump says he plans to increase defense spending even more.

August
It’s the dog days of August with Congress off and Democrats still struggling to find their voice.

Meanwhile, Trump continues to use Twitter to beat down his congressional critics.

Hillary Clinton makes her first substantial criticism of the Trump agenda. Trump responds, on Twitter.

Twitter officials finally get to meet with Trump.

September
Congress comes back, feeling a bit more confident.

Hearings begin on the second Trump nominee to the Supreme Court.

Alec Baldwin erupts on social media again.

Congress passes adjustments to the Antiquities Act. Trump reclassifies hundreds of thousands of acres in the Western states, revoking status President Obama gave them.

October
Trump visits Chicago and vows to win Illinois in 2020.

Trump shocks the media and liberals by proposing an expansion of Second Amendment rights. He also proposes getting rid of the Johnson Amendment, which forbids churches and temples from engaging in political behavior. Trump says churches and temples should not lose their tax-exempt status for the same.

November
U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) all but announces for president in 2020.

CEOs announce more jobs expansions, right before Thanksgiving. Trump thanks them on Twitter.

December
Trump says his first year was a substantial political and legislative success.

Trump’s approval ratings approach 60 percent.

Trump signs at least two presidential orders relating to Christmas.

meet the author

Political reporter, LifeZette. Indiana University journalism grad. Boston U. business grad. Former Indiana, Alabama statehouse reporter, Daytona Beach editorial writer.

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