Health

The Secret to Sticking with Your Gym Membership

These insider tips might just boost your health

Getting back into shape is a commitment scores of us make as the new year rolls around. Often that involves signing up for a gym membership.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t take long before most of us reschedule that goal — again — for next year.

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If you don’t want to fail in 2017 at losing weight, feeling healthier, and giving your body and mind some important and potentially life-saving workouts, check out the insider tips mentioned in the video above to make the most of your gym membership.

They include, for the record, the right way to use the treadmill (although it’s hard to believe there’s a wrong way).

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Another mistake enthusiastic gym goers often make is neglecting to read the fine print before they sign on the dotted line, according to consumer protection experts.

There are thousands of complaints filed annually against health clubs; typically the issues revolve around canceling a contract or dealing with billing and collections.

You should always review contracts for information, including length of contract, cancellation fees, agreed payment methods, and due dates, and what benefits are included in the price of membership, according to Howard Schwartz, spokesman for the Connecticut Better Business Bureau, in a press release.

“Whether you received a gym membership as a gift or if you purchase one for yourself, the bottom line is to make sure you get the best experience at the best price and lose weight — not money,” Schwartz said.

Related: The Number-One Rule of Weight Loss

The goal, assuming you’re up for it, is at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous activity, or an equivalent mix per week, according to the American Heart Association. Any movement helps, though, including just getting out for a walk.

Related: So Their Workouts Are Wacky … So What?

Two to three sessions per week of strength training that exercises the major muscle groups of the legs, trunk, and arms and shoulders are also recommended for the best results.

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