Entertainment

An Even ‘Fuller House,’ with a Few Complications

Series creator Jeff Franklin responds to critics disappointed in the show's less-than-family-friendly storylines

When it was announced that “Full House” would get the “Arrested Development” treatment — meaning a new season, but on Netflix — fans were understandably as guarded as they were excited. The resulting show, “Fuller House,” is a major success for the streaming service, but it’s had its share of critics, too.

Some viewers said it was too racy to be considered family friendly viewing.

One fan wrote: “The light swearing and continual sexual innuendos in ‘Fuller House’ were too much for my 8- and 6-year-old daughters, who are so obsessed with ‘Full House.’ I’m hoping Season 2 is more family-friendly.”

[lz_ndn video=31700073]

“Disappointed viewer here,” wrote another viewer. “Please make Season 2 appropriate for family viewing. I don’t want political correctness (same-gender kissing etc.), sexual innuendos, masturbation references, sexy dancing, and drinking. I want the cheesy jokes, hugs, and silly scenarios that ‘Full House’ is known and loved for. Please cut the other stuff out.”

And still another fan requested that star Candace Cameron Bure, an outspoken Christian conservative, connect more with her faith in Season Two.

Do you support individual military members being able to opt out of getting the COVID vaccine?

By completing the poll, you agree to receive emails from LifeZette, occasional offers from our partners and that you've read and agree to our privacy policy and legal statement.

Catch is — DJ Tanner isn’t necessarily a Christian conservative.

Despite the slow trickle of criticism, there was clearly still an appetite for the Tanner family. The first season of the modern-day revival pulled in an average audience of 7.33 million viewers in the 18 to 49 age demographic.

“Fuller House” follows the all-grown-up Tanner sisters, DJ (Bure) and Stephanie (Jodie Sweetin), who live together in their San Francisco childhood home with DJ’s three children, her best childhood friend, Kimmy Gibbler (Andrea Barber) and her 13-year-old daughter. This follows a similar storyline to that of the original series, with Stephanie and Kimmy moving in with the widowed DJ to help her raise her children.

Related: Why Amazon’s ‘Grand Tour’ Is a Raging Success

The first season left off with many cliffhangers — a DJ love triangle, tension between Kimmy and her ex, Fernando (Juan Pablo Di Pace), and even some tension between the kids. Series creator Jeff Franklin promises those storylines will be touched upon in the new season, especially D.J.’s love life.

He talked with LifeZette about the show.

Question: What do you make of some of the criticisms?
Answer:
It’s a little bit edgier, but I still think it’s family friendly. It’s not as schmaltzy as it was when it was the anchor of ABC’s “TGIF” lineup. We don’t use music to evoke emotion anymore. To take us out of a scene.

“Some of our longtime fans expressed concerns.”

Q: Do you think there’s a double standard at play, whereas Danny’s wife had passed, he was dating and it was fine — and DJ is in the exact same situation and there’s been an outcry?
A: I wouldn’t call it an outcry. Some of our longtime fans expressed concerns — and I think because it was DJ, a character they came to know and love, as opposed to Danny, who they obviously didn’t know when the show premiered. Plus, they had watched her grow up.

Q: Some have said the Stephanie character, who is supposed to mirror Uncle Jessie, hints at having partied extensively, while Jessie was merely a musician who simply had stories from the road.
A: I think some fans were having a tough time differentiating between Stephanie the character and Jodie Sweetin — the actress who plays her. They feel like they know [her] from the tabloids in the years since “Full House” went off the air.

Q: You just bought the actual house from the beginning of the show, correct?
A: Yep, I was there all weekend. Met some neighbors. Some were very excited — others, not so much. After all, it’s been 20 years of people posing for photos out front, jumping out of their car to sing the theme song in the middle of the night — that kind of thing.

Join the Discussion

Comments are currently closed.