Politics

TransAmerica: New Student Athlete Controversy

When a boy 'identifies as a girl' and competes as one, confusion ensues

The Left’s concerted attempts at bullying schools into accepting transgender identity with no questions asked received a setback Friday when a trans female runner knocked out disgruntled contenders in the girls 100- and 200-meter race events.

“I don’t know what’s politically correct to say, but in my opinion your gender is what you’re born with,” said one runner. “It’s the DNA. Genetically a guy has more muscle mass than a girl, and if he’s racing against a girl, he may have an advantage.”

Nattaphon “Ice” Wangyot, an immigrant from Thailand who moved to the U.S. in 2014, is believed to be Alaska’s first trans athlete to compete in an individual event as part of a high school championship. When Wangyot — a senior representing Haines High School — competed in the state’s track and field meet at the Dimond Alumni Field in Anchorage Friday, she qualified for Saturday’s finals in her events. But Wangyot’s historic achievement did not go unnoticed by her fellow competitors.

“I don’t know what’s politically correct to say, but in my opinion your gender is what you’re born with,” junior Peyton Young, winner of the Class 4A girls 3,200-meter race, told Alaska Dispatch News. “It’s the DNA. Genetically a guy has more muscle mass than a girl, and if he’s racing against a girl, he may have an advantage.”

Wangyot’s results, which bumped biologically female competitors out of potential slots for the girls 100- and 200-meter finals, left some of the ousted girls frustrated.

“I’m glad that this person is comfortable with who they are and they’re able to be happy in who they are, but I don’t think it’s competitively, completely, 100-percent fair,” athlete Saskia Harrison, who just missed the cut for one of the categories, told KTVA-TV.

Do You Think Kyle Rittenhouse Will Be Found Guilty or Innocent?

By completing the poll, you agree to receive emails from LifeZette, occasional offers from our partners and that you've read and agree to our privacy policy and legal statement.

Stephanie Leigh Golmon Williams, a mother of one of the athletes, said Wangyot’s ability to compete in the girls events was “not fair and it is not right for our female athletes.” She added, “We have a responsibility to protect our girls that have worked really hard, that are working towards college scholarships,” as The Washington Times reported.

To make matters worse, the Alaska School Activities Association’s attempt to clarify the controversy over the fair treatment of trans and non-trans athletes only caused further confusion. Instead of making a decision to either allow or disallow trans students from competing in the gender division of their choice, the ASAA voted unanimously in April to accept each individual school’s policy for its athletes. This move forces non-compliant or neutral schools to pit their female athletes against any potential biologically male ones in competitions.

Haines High School’s subsequent policy reads, “For the purposes of gender identification for interscholastic activities, the district will consider the gender identity based on the student’s consistent declaration of gender identity, their actions, attitude, dress, and mannerisms.”

And the school doesn’t care what concerned naysayers think of its policy.

“Everybody doesn’t understand, and that’s OK. But you still have to show respect, and we work together and we talk about things and we try to make it respectful for everybody.”

“Everybody doesn’t understand, and that’s OK,” said Haines principal Rene Martin. “But you still have to show respect, and we work together and we talk about things and we try to make it respectful for everybody.”

On a much larger competitive scale, the International Olympic Committee at least recognized the biological and hormonal differences between male and female athletes — regardless of which gender they choose to align themselves with – when it announced changes to its policy in January. Although it no longer requires sexual reassignment surgery, the new policy mandates that male-to-female athletes must prove that their testosterone levels are below the cutoff point at least one year before competing. Female-to-male participation requires no restrictions.

Although Wangyot claims that she is taking female hormones and using drugs to repress her testosterone levels, the outcry against her successful participation in the weekend competition only shows that there are many questions left unanswered by the liberal social engineers attempting to rewrite how society looks at gender.

Join the Discussion

Comments are currently closed.