Politics

Walker Dodges Birthright Citizenship

Governor would solve issue with immigration enforcement

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has waffled on the issue of birthright citizenship, refused Thursday to say specifically how he would tackle the issue.

Appearing on “The Laura Ingraham Show,” he failed despite repeated questioning to explain how he would prevent foreigners from entering the U.S. legally and having babies, suggesting he would address the issue with vigorous enforcement of immigration laws.

“I’m consistent on this,” Walker declared. “I said, I’m not looking to change the Constitution. What I am looking to do is a combination of securing the border and enforcing the laws.”

Walker only recently firmed up his position on the issue. At the Iowa State Fair last month, the governor, who is seeking the Republican nomination in the 2016 presidential contest, endorsed the idea of ending automatic citizenship for the children born on U.S. soil to illegal immigrants.

“Well, like I said, Harry Reid said it’s not right for this country,” he told reporters then, referring to a position that the Senate minority leader held in the 1990s. “I think that’s something we should — yeah, absolutely, going forward.”

Afterward, Walker said he believes that birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, a position he reiterated Thursday.

Walker has slipped behind billionaire Donald Trump and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson in recent polling on the first-in-the-nation caucus state.

Do you support individual military members being able to opt out of getting the COVID vaccine?

By completing the poll, you agree to receive emails from LifeZette, occasional offers from our partners and that you've read and agree to our privacy policy and legal statement.

Once the clear frontrunner in Iowa, Walker has slipped behind billionaire Donald Trump and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson in recent polling on the first-in-the-nation caucus state.

Walker told Ingraham he supports calls to require Republican candidates to sign loyal oaths in exchange for ballot access, a proposal clearly aimed at Trump. Trump has agreed to sign such a pledge, which is being circulated by the RNC.

“At the first debate, everybody said ‘yes’ (to whether they would support the ultimate nominee) except one guy in the middle,” said Walker. “I think it makes sense. I think the worst thing America could have is Hillary Clinton be elected president.”

Walker said he is the best person to take on Clinton, and he also took a jab at former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush: “We don’t need another name from the past.”

Walker sided with a Kentucky clerk who has refused to issue marriage license to a gay couple and now faces jail time for her refusal.

“It is the most important thing, to uphold the Constitution. It is the freedom of religion, not freedom from religion,” he said. “I think that’s a fundamental right.”

Join the Discussion

Comments are currently closed.