Politics

George Will’s Trump Diagnosis

'Not a conservative, not sure he's a Republican'

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Real estate developer Donald Trump continues to lead the GOP presidential polls and confound political analysts, but conservative commentator George Will predicted Monday it is only a matter of time before the novice candidate fades.

Appearing on “The Laura Ingraham Show,” Will compared Trump’s candidacy to a classic third-party bid — a candidate who attracts early support on the strength of one burning issue but who ultimately fails.

“I do think that there comes a serious hour,” Will said. “The serious hour is when people approach the Iowa caucuses or the polling booths in New Hampshire and they say, ‘We’re not sending a message; we’re not venting; we’re not doing catharsis; here we’re picking a president.’ And, I think at that point he will fade away.”

Will said it is not hard to figure out Trump’s appeal: He speaks plainly at a time when voters are put off by the large number of topics the politically correct set insist are off-limits.

Will said it is not hard to figure out Trump’s appeal: He speaks plainly at a time when voters are put off by the large number of topics that the politically correct set insist are off-limits.

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“Now, if he had a better quality mind it would be more interesting. The other day he said, ‘Maybe there are 11 million illegal immigrants in the country; I think it’s 30,’” Will said. “He just makes this stuff up as he goes along. It’s very unfortunate that people hankering for someone who tells it like it is doesn’t tell it like it is, who thinks that political incorrectness is a substitute for information and evidence. But, this is a fever we’re going to have to go through for a while, obviously.”

Will said the Aug. 6 debate in Cleveland will be a key moment.

“We’re going to find out if Trump behaves himself like a reasonably civilized person and, if he doesn’t, how the others respond to him,” Will said.

“And, we’re going to find out if Trump behaves himself like a reasonably civilized person and, if he doesn’t, how the others respond to him,” he said.

To conservatives uninspired by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush — Ingraham suggested that he and Democrat Hillary Clinton are so close on some key issues that they could run on the same ticket — Will said there are significant differences between the two parties. Presidents control a huge federal apparatus, and the people who staff those agencies and departments have a tremendous impact on ordinary Americans’ lives, he said.

“I would say that the most important thing a president does in his first four months after being nominated, after being elected, is fill 3,000 policymaking positions throughout the federal government, including to take one example not quite at random, the Civil Rights Department, Office of the Department of Education, which is now ruining campuses with this sexual assault hysteria,” said Will. “Three thousand policymaking jobs. Do you want them drawn from the pool of Republican talent or the pool from Democratic talent?”

Will said virtually every Republican in the race could be counted on to hire conservatives for the top jobs — everyone but one candidate.

Not including Donald Trump, who I know is not a conservative, and I’m sure he’s not a Republican,” Will said.

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