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Seven Celebrities Who Keep Their Politics Under Wraps

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Celebrities these days are more involved with politics than ever before. Though it can hurt careers, many artists on both the Right and the Left risk it, for better or worse, for a chance to throw their voice and their opinions into the mix.

There are still some, though, who choose to keep their names away from politics, likely in an attempt to capture the widest audience possible and to refrain from influencing the way people view them on the big screen or on the stage. Elvis Presley famously said to a reporter in the ’70s when asked about Vietnam protests, “Honey, I’d just as soon keep my own personal views about that to myself. I’m just an entertainer.” And think of celebrities, such as the great comedian Bob Newhart, who rarely if ever share their political opinions in public forums — older and wiser, they know better.

There aren't many adhering to such attitudes today, but it's an intriguing idea nonetheless — especially in a world in which the churn of celebrity headlines as well as social media provide a constant temptation for popular artists to preach.

Here's a look at seven celebrities who keep quiet on politics.

1.) Mark Wahlberg. Wahlberg doesn't like talking politics and he's no fan of celebrities that do. While promoting last year's "Patriots Day," the actor touched on the notion of celebrities getting involved in politics when talking to Task & Purpose magazine. "A lot of celebrities did, do, and shouldn't," he said.

Related: Mark Wahlberg to Celebrity Whiners: Hush Up [1]

Wahlberg added that the results of the 2016 presidential election proved how ineffective celebrity preaching was anyway. "It just goes to show you that people aren't listening to that anyway ... They might buy your CD or watch your movie, but you don't put food on their table. You don't pay their bills."

The actor, who stars in this summer's "Transformers: The Last Knight," further said much of Hollywood is too out of touch to relate to the average blue-collar American. "A lot of Hollywood is living in a bubble. They're pretty out-of-touch with the common person, the everyday guys out there providing for their family. Me, I'm very aware of the real world. I come from the real world and I exist in the real world. And although I can navigate Hollywood and I love the business and the opportunities it's afforded me, I also understand what it's like not to have all that."

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Nicole Kidman. The actress dislikes talking politics, which sets her apart from many of her peers. Kidman actually got a lot of flack in January when she commented on Donald Trump's election win. She gave a generic statement in support; while it didn't align her politically with him, it still infuriated those with their heels dug in against the then-incoming administration.

"I just say: 'He's now elected and we as a country need to support whoever is the president, because that's what the country is based on,'" Kidman told the BBC. She added that she holds dual citizenships in Australia and America and did vote in the 2016 presidential election, but talking politics was not her style. "I'm always reticent to, sort of, comment politically." Kidman did not want to reveal the candidate who earned her vote.

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Hugh Jackman. Jackman actually performed at a fundraiser for Hillary Clinton a few weeks before the 2016 presidential election. However, the Australian-born actor doesn't like commenting publicly or preaching to his audience.

At a recent fundraiser called "A National Night of Laughter and Song," which was hosted by the David Lynch Foundation and raised money to help teach transcendental meditation to youth and veterans, Jackman dodged political questions from The Hill's "In the Know."

"There's a lot," he said when asked about whether he has feelings about the current political climate in America. "But I'm also aware — as an Aussie who actually doesn't vote — I'd find it hard if I was in Australia and I had American actors coming down talking about my political system."

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Carrie Underwood. "I prefer to stay away from politics," the singer told journalists at a press event before the 2016 CMA Awards. At the awards show, she and Brad Paisley made some jokes about the election, but nothing that aligned them politically with anyone or seemed like preaching.

Back in 2008, the country star also told Access Hollywood, "I lose all respect for celebrities when they back a candidate."

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Kevin Hart. The actor and comedian was quite chummy with former President Barack Obama, but Hart prefers to keep politics out of his act, especially in the wake of the 2016 presidential election.

"When you jump into that political realm, you're alienating some of your audience," Hart recently told Variety. "The world today, it's really not a laughing matter. It's serious."

He added, "I don't want to draw attention to things I don't have nice things to say about."

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Josh Duhamel. The star of this summer's "Transformers: The Last Knight" likes to stay out of politics completely.

"I don't like to get involved politically at all," the actor told Fox News this week in an interview. "Nobody cares what I think politically. Anybody in entertainment who thinks people care what they think politically are really misinformed. That's one thing I stay away from. I stay away from politics because nobody cares what I think."

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William Shatner. The well-known "Star Trek" actor has said his Canadian roots keep him from going political and from criticizing the president.

"I don't want to discuss [Donald] Trump or [George] Takei," the 86-year-old actor told The Daily Beast when pressed about politics in a recent interview. "Listen, I'm Canadian and I'm apolitical. I love America. I consider myself a guest here."

He jokingly added, "I won't do anything that might get me deported."

Shatner's stance is far from that of his "Star Trek" co-star George Takei, who is constantly using his Twitter account as a platform to criticize the president, a man he's referred to in the past as an "alien life form."

Shatner even refused to sign an open letter that "Star Trek" cast members such as Takei put together before the presidential election in support of Hillary Clinton.

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