What Is There to Lose? Black Voters Could Put Trump Over the Top

A demographic firmly rooted in the Democratic base could provide an upset Tuesday

by Edmund Kozak | Updated 08 Nov 2016 at 3:40 PM

Black voters could be the key to a Trump victory Tuesday.

Preliminary figures released over the last week or so suggest that black voter turnout is down for Clinton and the Democrats — and up for Trump and the Republicans.

“Every African-American citizen in this country is entitled to a government that puts their jobs wages and security first.”

Indeed, the Clinton campaign was so rattled by initial reports of low black voter turnout that it spent the entire final week before the election parading a steady stream of black celebrities in front of the electorate, and even resorted to having President Obama near-beg for black voters to turn out.

“I need you to go out and just nag the heck out of folks who aren’t voting,” Obama said at a Nov. 4 Clinton rally. “I need you to tell them that Barack is personally asking them.”

According to a Nov. 2 average of five major nationwide polls, Clinton then commanded 83.3 percent of the black vote to Trump’s 4.3 percent. Clinton’s lead among African-American voters in important swing states like Florida has also hovered around the 80 percent mark. But Obama’s support among black voters was well into the 90s.

Just as Clinton is doing worse overall among black voters than Obama did, Trump is doing far better among black voters than Romney was in 2012. A number of polls indicate he could double Romney's showing with black voters, which was only 6 percent of the vote nationally.

A Harper Polling survey of Pennsylvania voters released on Friday showed Trump with the support of nearly 18.5 percent of black voters in that state. Another Pennsylvania poll performed by Remington Research Group, released on Oct. 30, showed Trump with 19 percent support among black voters.

A Siena University poll of likely Florida voters showed Trump receiving the support of 13 percent of black voters. Another Remington Research poll, this time of Virginia voters, also showed Trump with the support of 19 percent of black voters there.

More polling by Remington Research released over the weekend showed Trump getting 22 percent of the black vote in Florida, 19 percent in North Carolina, 22 percent of black voters in Wisconsin, and a groundbreaking 29 percent of the black vote in Pennsylvania. By comparison, Romney took only 5 percent of the black vote in Florida, 4 percent in North Carolina, 6 percent in Wisconsin, and 7 percent in Pennsylvania.

It's not hard to see why Trump is doing unusually well for a Republican with black voters.

Unlike every Republican in at least this writer's lifetime, Trump actually made direct, honest appeals to black voters.

"Every African-American citizen in this country is entitled to a government that puts their jobs wages and security first," said Trump upon unveiling his "New Deal" with black Americans. "I'm asking today for the honor of your vote and the privilege of being your president," he continued. "Whether you vote for me or not, I will be your greatest champion," Trump promised.

"I find it refreshing that Trump actually pleaded for the black vote," Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke told LifeZette. "Life has not improved [for minorities] with this monolithic [Democratic] voting pattern," he said. "Anybody living in those ghettos knows [what Trump was talking about in Milwaukee] … they see it all around them."

Trump is the first Republican to offer the black community something tangible beyond "liberty and personal responsibility" — jobs, a government that cares about them, and a real future.

"To reach the black community you have to speak to them directly," Bishop E.W. Jackson, head of Exodus Faith Ministries and founder of S.T.A.N.D., told LifeZette in August. "Donald Trump is the first candidate for president in my memory who has done that," Jackson said.

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