Evangelical Christians Are Helping to Change America

Donald Trump has consistently, unwaveringly, and steadfastly put forth what we hold near and dear

by Dan Celia | Updated 09 Nov 2016 at 12:44 PM

Today, I believe that God has given this country another chance. But the question remains: Will we exercise the wisdom He has given us — and will we be forever vigilant not to squander this amazing opportunity?

It’s now time for the coming together of America — and for the coming together of policies, ideas, and agendas that will push America forward. It’s time to see if the negotiating skills of a Donald Trump administration come into play with his own party, as well as reach across the aisle. I believe that this administration will truly be focused on “We The People,” and it may be the first time in 20 years Americans have experienced this. We now face a time where wisdom desperately needs to be exercised.

“Donald Trump is the only candidate who can beat Hillary Clinton,” said a pastor and friend a year ago.

This morning at 1 a.m., I heard a prominent person in the media say that the doctrine of Christian evangelicals has exploded. I suppose she believes Donald Trump did not stand for conservative evangelical principles. After all, he was not considered a conservative evangelical, and most of us just wouldn’t vote for him, right?

As I think of how proud and excited I am that 81 percent of evangelicals did indeed vote for Donald Trump, I realize her statement was far from reality. If there has been an explosion among evangelicals, it has been the realization of the absolute power God has given His people. It’s the realization that this voting bloc of more than 40 million Christians can return America to its conservative roots, religious freedoms, and the Judeo-Christian principles on which it was founded, without the fear of persecution by our own government.

Oh, yes, there has been an explosion with evangelical Christians — but not the kind of explosion the media is talking about. Donald Trump has been the only presidential candidate who has consistently, unwaveringly, and steadfastly put forth what we hold so near and dear.

A year ago, my good friend Dr. Robert Jeffress, senior pastor at First Baptist Church in Dallas, said to me, “Donald Trump is the only candidate who can beat Hillary Clinton.” How right he was.

Related: A Trump Presidency: A Victory for the Unborn

Trump has united the sick-and-tired, fed-up evangelical voters and given us the encouragement and the motivation to believe that we can — and will — make a difference. Trump’s stance on appointing Supreme Court justices, protecting the sanctity of life, defining marriage, overturning Roe v. Wade, defunding Planned Parenthood, and preserving religious freedoms are ideals that conservative evangelicals haven’t been able to count on consistently for many years.

No, this was not an explosion of doctrine — but rather a strengthening position from what sometimes seemed like the most unlikely candidate God could have chosen. But as we read the Old Testament, we come to the understanding that God has a way of choosing unlikely candidates. The fundamental principles of desiring to see our conservative values, the U.S. Constitution, and God’s principles upheld by a genuine candidate who is willing to fight for these things is what drove us to the polls.

Evangelical voters were not looking to put a preacher in the White House. We were looking for the man or woman — righteous or unrighteous — whom God would use to take us back to how He first shaped this country.

And I believe we’ve found him.

Dan Celia is president and CEO of Financial Issues Stewardship Ministries Inc., and host of the nationally syndicated radio and television program “Financial Issues,” heard daily on more than 600 stations across the country and reaching millions of households on the National Religious Broadcasters Network, BizTV, and Dove-TV. 

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